Max’s Mexico Art “Uncertain Times”

In these uncertain times, it seems appropriate to separate this new phase of Max’s Art. We were on vacation in Baja California Sur, Mexico when COVID-19 spiked. I had brought Max to Laguna San Ignacio to see the Grey Whales for his 19th birthday. It was too dangerous to bring him home. We are currently sheltering in place in La Paz.

With his lung issues and reduced immunity, getting COVID-19 most likely would be fatal to him. I have tremendous gratitude to be in a safer place. There is less virus here.

In the past three months Max has seen and touched Grey whales. He is swimming in the Sea of Cortez and painting on the beach! He is healthy and happy. He does not really understand what is happening. Please feel free to reach out to us. Max is very social and he misses his friends. 

I hope these paintings touch your heart and bring you the same joy and happiness they have brought us during these uncertain times.

“Rivers” Frank Turner series I
“21 Century Survival Blues” Frank Turner Series II
“Peggy Sang the Blues” Frank Turner series III
Tecolote
Laguna San Ignacio
Acrylic on Canvas
24 x 36

We had just arrived at Laguna San Ignacio. We went whale watching for Max’s 19th birthday. You could tell he was so excited to be hearing the sound of the Grey whales. They would blow and he would just laugh and laugh! This is his first painting of our month-long stay at the lagoon.

Tortuga Release
Acrylic on Canvas
16×20

We participated in a pilot turtle release program at Laguna San Ignacio. We spent an evening helping measure and tag turtles and then release them back into the water. Max was incredibly excited. His turtle was named Alonso. 

Baile de Ballenas
Acrylic on Canvas
24×36

Max painted this after a couple of weeks at the lagoon. We had been out whale watching multiple times. His excitement and connection with the whales was amazing. He painted this after his first close encounter of touching a Grey whale!

Laguna de Amor
Acrylic on Canvas
24×36

This is Max’s third painting of the Grey whales in Laguna San Ignacio. He was feeling the incredible beauty and energy of the lagoon.

Tecolote
Acrylic on Canvas
16×20

Tecolote Beach is in La Paz, Baja California Sur. This is where Max and I are sheltering in place. We come here to swim and paint. There’s no one here so it is safe. It has a breathtaking view north to Espiritu Santo Island. Max painted this after swimming one day.

Rivers
Frank Turner Series I
Acrylic on Canvas
16×20

Max loves Frank Turner. We were having a great day listening to his music. He painted the next three paintings listening to his songs. The lyrics shine through his Art. They speak deeply to these uncertain times. 

21st Century Survival Blues
Frank Turner Series II
Acrylic on Canvas
16×20

This was Max’s second painting in the Frank Turner series. Amazing to me the colors he chose. He loved this song. It reflects his surviving COVID 19 on our beach.

“I’ve got the 21st century survival blues
I’ve got shelter, drinking water I’ve got cupboards of food
And I know I can survive in my apocalypse home
But what’s the point of surviving if you’re just surviving alone

So meet me at home when the sirens go off
I don’t wanna be alone so don’t you get lost
I know a place where the two of us can hide
We can barricade the door and we’d be safe inside
When the harsh winds blow and the world gets cold
You can’t trust kindness and you can’t eat gold
I’ve got the 21st century survival blues
But to tell you the truth I just need you” by Frank Turner

Peggy Sang the Blues
Frank Turner Series III
Acrylic on Canvas 16×20

This is Max’s third painting in the Frank Turner Rock Out on the Beach series. This is was his favorite song of the day. The lyrics are vividly expressed in the painting…

‘Cause better times are coming
Better times ahead
And no one gets remembered
My deathless child
Don’t waste too long in bed

And Peggy said:
It doesn’t matter where you come from
It matters where you go
And no one gets remembered
In this listless, loveless life
For the things they didn’t do”

by Frank Turner